trophy watch: those who bounce back



No Wimbledon hangovers here: For those players who choose to play the week after Wimbledon on the tours, they never know quite what they’re getting themselves into until they get onto the court and realize, Hey, this isn’t Wimbledon! For the men the surface transition might be a little easier (the only event offered is a grass court tune-down — is that what you call a surface-specific post-Slam small event?), though they go further geographically, crossing the Atlantic while the women stay in Europe (Sweden and Hungary, respectively). 

Newport: While John Isner was left off the losing US Davis Cup team, the 6-foot-9 big-serving American took a wild card into the Campbell’s International Tennis Hall of Fame Championships and won the tourney, the first top seed to do so in its 35-year history. And while he stood much taller than 5-foot-6 Olivier Rochus, the 26-year-old barely inched past the Belgian, 6-3 7-6 (6). The 15-inch difference between the two players was the greatest in ATP history.

Clay ladies: Polona Hercog and Roberta Vinci were happy to be back on the red stuff, winning titles in Bastad and Budapest, respectively. Hercog nabbed her first WTA win with help of an injured Caroline Wozniacki (who withdrew in the second round), beating local Johanna Larsson in the final, 6-4 7-5. Vinci, meanwhile, captured her third title of the year, defeating Irina-Camelia Begu, 6-4 1-6 6-4. See Vinci below.

(Isner and Vinci via the AP; Hercog image by the Swedish Open via the WTA)

trophy watch: everyone gets a slice of french pie



In men’s doubles, Peruvian Luis Horna and Uruguayan player Pablo Cuevas (look at that smile!) took out Nenad Zimonjic and Daniel Nestor 6-2,6-3 in the Saturday men’s doubles final.

Another tennis mama, Virginia Ruano Pascual (second right), teamed with Anabel Medina Garrigues to win the women’s doubles title over Francesca Schiavone and Casey Dellacqua. That cute kid is Virginia’s.

Bob Bryan might not have done so well with twin brother Mike Bryan in the men’s doubles draw, but he got together with Victoria Azarenka to notch another Grand Slam title over Zimonjic and Katarina Srebotnik.

Taipei’s Tsung-Hua Yang beat Polish Jerzy Jankowicz 6-3, 7-6 for the boys’ singles title.

The black-tanked girls’ doubles team of Polona Hercog (left) and Jessica Moore defeated the Dutch team of Leslay Kerkhove and Arantxa Rus.

Not pictured: Girls’ singles winner is Simona Halep over fellow Romanian Elena Bogdan 6-4, 6-7(3), 6-2. The boys’ doubles title went to Henri Kontinen of Finland and Christopher Rungkat of Indonesia.

Anders Jarryd (left) and John McEnroe triumphed over Mansour Bahrami and Henri Leconte in the men’s over-45 final.

(photos by Getty Images)

JNP's eighth day: juniors and the bondarenkos



Photo: The Bondarenko sisters on the practice court. That’s Alyona giving me a look. (She smiled at me later so we were cool for sure.) Kateryna‘s digging for water.

Pretty slow day today, but I happened to get a good look at some young talent (the U.S. Open Juniors tournament started yesterday):

Polona Hercog — this Slovenian is a big and powerful all-court player; hits the ball deep.

CoCo Vandeweghe — a highly-regarded young junior out of Southern California.

Jessica Moore — the Australian has a small build but a big game. (She took out third seed Madison Brengle in the first round of the juniors tourney; she lost to Lucie Safarova in the first round of the main draw.)

Ksenia Pervak — the fifth seed is great, but needs to learn how to finish matches (she gave up three games in the second set to a much less developed girl).

TSF contributor JNP is in New York reporting from the U.S. Open trenches. He’s been checking in with us everyday. Read his previous posts here. And our U.S. Open coverage here.