Search Results for: bethanie

tsf interview: monica seles talks twitter, figure skating and her love of fashion

I cannot tell you how many thousands of hours I have spent hitting a tennis ball against a wall. Recently, I moved to Harlem in Manhattan and have discovered that there are hand ball walls just two blocks away from my new place. My afternoons? Now often spent hitting the ball against the wall, with curious walkers by baffled that I’m not playing hand or racquet ball.

Much of this fascination is due to the fact that when I was just 12 I read Monica SelesFrom Fear to Victory, the book that chronicled her life into tennis — including her love of hitting the tennis ball against a wall in a parking lot below her family’s apartment.

This last Monday I got the chance to talk to Monday for the third time in my short, young career as a journalist. I was visiting HSBC‘s “Wimbledon at Rockefeller Plaza,” a week-long event that the Wimbledon-partnered bank has put on for several year that allows Manhattan to boast a grass court in the city — even just for one week.

It was here that I (full disclosure: I was on a media pass both for TennisWire.org and TSF) got to talk to both Monica Seles and Jim Courier. For more on the HSBC event and it’s details, see the Courier post here (or scroll up).

TSF: Monica, what about social media? Why aren’t you tweeting up a storm?
Monica Seles: 
I don’t think anybody would care what Monica Seles is eating or what she’s doing.

TSF: [Laughing.] Monica, are you kidding?! I think you’d be surprised.
MS:
I’m an old dinosaur. [Twitter] is more all of these reality show stars that everyone watches. This is how this generation that has shifted. We didn’t have reality TV when I was growing up and now they’re the biggest stars. I really enjoy [my time away from the computer] because I’m on it a lot for work, but you kind of have to. My 10-year-old godson is tutoring me on the computer of how to navigate everything.

TSF: But you did Dancing With the Stars, so you’re sort of a reality star. What about trying Skating With the Stars?
MS:
 I couldn’t even [dance on] dry land! [Laughing.]

TSF: But you skated as a kid, right?
MS:
Yeah, I skated for about a year and a half. That’s what I wanted to be. I loved it. I loved the costumes and all the glamor stuff. But I haven’t been on ice skates since I was 8 years old. I think being on Dancing With the Stars was enough. [The show] was more about art and how you look and how you present yourself. In tennis I didn’t have to worry about where the camera was or what angle to smile at. I loved [Dancing] because it was so out of my comfort zone.

TSF: What about favorite figure skaters. Do you have any?
MS:
I always liked Kristi Yamaguchi in skating and she was on Dancing with me. And I always liked Nancy Kerrigan, too.

TSF: So you didn’t get to design figure skating costumes, but you still love fashion. Do you ever see yourself diving into it like Venus Williams or Maria Sharapova have?
MS:
[Fashion] is something I enjoy looking at, but I don’t know. Tennis is really hard because all of the big companies have kind of taken over. I love it when you see the girls come out [for the players’ parties] and you want to see what everyone is wearing. Now, it’s going to be more and more daring. At Wimbledon all the girls got all dressed up and it allows the fans to see the girls in a different light — I like that.

TSF: Did you see Bethanie Mattek-Sands’ dress?
MS:
[Laughing.] No… but I heard about it. I saw Maria’s and Ana Ivanovic‘s. Ana was very classy.

TSF: What is one thing that you must do when you’re in New York in the summer?
MS:
I love Shake Shack in Madison Square Park. It’s really nice to just sit and be outside — I love being outside. You can sit there on a nice day and just have your friends eat with you — that’s my favorite.

TSF: Do you ever think there’s going to be a young star again? WTA success seems to be coming at an older age these days.
MS:
Oh yeah. The tour has their age regulations, but there are always going to be young girls coming up who are powerful. Martina was powerful. And then Stefani. And then me. Then the Williams sisters came along. I think the sport always evolves. Maybe age mentally — how you manage success and fame and money — but otherwise, I think we’ll always have young players coming up.

(tsf photo)

she shouldn't have smiled

Forget about Roger Federer‘s records possibly being broken by Nole or Rafa — we’re in awe of Bethanie Mattek-Sands finally snapping Jelena Jankovic‘s record for worst gimmicky outfit worn to a party. It only took three years to oust her shopping buddy. Congrats, BMS!

A scowl on Bethanie might have helped us all stomach this, uhm, dress, designed by the UK-based Alex Noble (who frequently works with Lady Gaga). But all the giddiness and excitement was too much to contain; she couldn’t help being the balls of the ball.

Browse: Check out Noble’s blog to see some his other work (including the main outfit worn by Gaga in the “Judas” music video).

(Photo by Gareth Cattermole/Getty Images for WTA)

the gals get glammed for wimbledon player party

Girls’ night out: Those pictures of Bethanie Mattek-Sands have us shuddering. But at least a few of the WTA ladies got all glammed up in the right way for last night’s Wimbledon Players’ Party.

More party: Maria’s need-it-now necklace

On the court: Dokic makes UNICEF Open final | Things are all held up at Eastbourne because of … rain

(WTA video)

stylistically french

Style lady. While she barely escaped unknown Frenchwoman Caroline Garzia today on the tennis court (3-6 6-4 6-0), Maria Sharapova is easy to find on any newsstand in New York: she’s plastered on the front of the New York Times Thursday Style section. The article, a lengthy feature, talks about the brand Maria has grown (herself) and her work in fashion — Cole Haan being the highlight. | Draw: Maria survives

Is that a black eye? While Sharapova’s quarter was blown wide open with Kim Clijsters’ loss, American Bethanie Mattek-Sands sits on the top half of the draw and next has to deal with the always-testy Jelena Jankovic. The talk, however, has been less about BMS’ play (it’s been rather good lately) and more about her ever-famous face make-up (seen above). Everyone seems to be chatting about BMS’ face, and less about her game. Though, after her hard-fought second round win, the Times gave her this headline: “A Rising American Now Has a Game as Bold as Her Style.” Touche, folks. But what about in a few weeks’ time when BMS dons her Wimbledon players’ party Gaga-inspired dress? There will be no talk of her tennis, we predict. Or can she have her cake and eat it too? Either way, she’s happy.

TSF Vault: All about Bethanie

Soft core porn? And leave it to the eds at the Huffington Post to come up with this headline, teasing out the WTA‘s new “Strong is Beautiful” campaign: “Is This Ad Campaign ‘Soft Core Porn That Has Nothing To Do with Tennis’?” The headline itself was from a blog post from back in September, when the original Times photo shoot ran that inspired the campaign. The Post asked readers in a poll about the campaign, an overall response (through Thursday afternoon) is below:

(BMS image via the AP; Huffington Post screen grab)

jelena jankovic goes back to pink

Jelena Jankovic continues on her bright-hued fashion path with a bright pink stop at this year’s French Open. (She wore pale pink to start out the year in Australia.) The floral pattern on her Anta dress is the same as the one she’s worn this spring (but in green). We might have opted for something other than the purple shoes — perhaps some yellow, to tease out that accent color from her dress? — but we’re loving how it looks against the clay.

Tennis: Jelena’s through to the third round after beating Alona Bondarenko and Vera Dushevina in straight sets. Her opponent will be the currently on-fire Bethanie Mattek-Sands. (Draw: Women’s Singles)

More: Two more pics after the cut…

erke's blue and orange

Yanina Wickmayer‘s fallen out of the new-It-Girl conversation, but we’re pretty sure no one told her. At this week’s Internazionali BNL d’Italia in Rome, she handed Ana Ivanovic the Serbian’s latest clay defeat. (Last week, it was in the hands of Bethanie Mattek-Sands in Madrid.) Wicky next plays top seed Caro Wozniacki, who started out the dirt season strong — she won Charleston — but lost to Goerges twice after. (Draw: Internazionali BNL d’Italia Women’s Singles)

Erke: Not a lot of new moves from the Erke camp as far as Yanina’s clothes are concerned. Same silhouette (keyhole in the back), different colorway.

(images by Alberto Pizzoli/AFP/Getty Images)

we want her to go to there

Bethanie Mattek-Sands needs to take her eyeblacking to the next level. Can we make a suggestion?

American on clay: At this week’s Mutua Madrid Open, she’s continuing her run into the single’s draw by beating qualifier Vania King 6-0, 6-2 in the second round. This, of course, after taking out Ana Ivanovic in three sets to start out the event. BMS’ll face the winner of the all-Italian battle between Schiavone and Errani. (Does Sara have the same Fed Cup beef as Vinci?)

Bracket: Mutua Madrid Women’s Singles.

(BMS image via Getty; Tyson image via src)

sunday survey: your best surface

The bruising brick red: It hasn’t been a great clay court season for American tennis so far in 2011. Is that surprising? Ryan Sweeting gave us hope for a little excitement when he won in Houston last month, and Bethanie Mattek-Sands scored a big win in Madrid today by knocking off Ana Ivanovic in three sets. But will the US of A make any sort of run in Paris? That’s doubtful.

But as the Americans struggle on the crushed brick, the American tennis-playing public is hitting the courts again with force as spring takes shape across the country. We’re curious: what’s your favorite surface to play on? Tell us below.

(Image by Aerial Photography via Flickr)

short balls: jewelry gets ballsy inspiration

By Benjamin Snyder

We’d hit and wear that: Sure there’s tennis ball furniture, but how about some accessories, too? Simone Preuss of 1-800-recycling.com reveals some “creative uses” for worn-out tennis balls. Preuss writes, “Tennis balls are probably the most difficult of any kind of sports ball to recycle, as the rubber used is not biodegradable. However, about 300 million balls are produced each year, contributing to some 20,000 metric tons of rubber waste.”

Never quite imagined that more could be done than simply tossing those dead balls after an intense hitting sesh, did ya? Well, from bracelets (above) to jar holders to tripods and purses look no further than this post for ideas to glamify your world with a little more tennis love. The only problem, Simone, where’s the how-to guide to make these ballin’ beauties ourselves? Needing it.

We get hashtag fatigue sometimes, too: Looking to check up on the tweets of even more players than usual suspect Serena Williams (who BTW now has over 2 millions followers)? Check out Tennis Players on Twitter. The new website allows fans to check in on all players at all times – in real time! Links go directly to players official pages, just in case you want to further investigate on Twitter itself. Really, this is cool. Oops: #reallythisiscool.

Big game, but how about Playboy fame? Caroline Wozniacki apparently denied Playboy and Maxim, which both wanted the Dane to grace their pages naked, according to a report from Danish newspaper Ekstra Bladet. She told reporters, “I’m not going to take off all my clothes,” while agent John Tobias continued, “She is still only 20 years [old]. That kind of photo series we’ll keep away from right now.” For more, click here.

Take us with you, BMS?

So maybe her attire is a little outrageous, but that’s why we love you, Bethanie. Well, girl can write, too.

Top 10-er, still: Besides fashion sense, American tennis in general seems to be on a bit of a decline up top with Serena Williams being the only top-ten ranked player after the latest rankings were revealed. Somehow, Serena managed to move up a couple spots despite having not played for months. Go figure. Then again with Serena, it’s better to stop trying and just roll with whatever story she headlines next, especially when it deals with the WTA ranking system.

(Images from 1-800-recycling.com and Twitter)

street fashion photography at its finest

Make sure to check out the documentary on photographer Bill Cunningham, whose images have been gracing the pages of The New York Times since the late 1970s. He has two photo-heavy columns — one on street fashion, “On the Street“; another on society, “Evening Hours” — that appear in the newspaper’s Sunday Styles section.

Because he celebrates those who make a statement, we wonder: which players’ styles would make a tennis edition of “On The Street”? Venus? Nadia? Bethanie?

More info: Including trailers, bios, reviews, and other bits — Bill Cunningham New York.